APAPA Celebrates the Selection of Katherine Tai as U.S. Trade Representative

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Sacramento, CA On December 10, President-elect Joseph Biden, appointed Katherine Tai as the next United States Trade Representative (USTR). Tai is noted to be a proven skilled negotiator with cases involving the European Union and China.

Tai’s career at USTR began in 2007 as an associate general counsel. In 2014 she was named chief counsel for China trade enforcement, overseeing disputes between Washington and Beijing at the World Trade Organization. She left that role in 2014 to join House Ways and Means and in 2017 was named chief trade lawyer for Chair Richard Neal (D-Mass).

Before her USTR career, Tai worked at a handful of law firms including Baker & McKenzie and Miller and Chevalier. Tai was born in Connecticut, raised in Washington, D.C., and is a graduate of Yale and Harvard Law School.

If confirmed, Tai would be the first woman of color and first Asian American to hold the role of top U.S. trade negotiator. The post is a Cabinet-level position within the Executive Office of the President.

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APAPA is a non-profit, non-partisan and grassroots organization. Its mission is to empower Asian and Pacific Islander (API) Americans through education, leadership, and active participation in civic and public affairs.

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