APAPA C.C. Yin’s Statement on Tragic Death of Long-time East Bay Leader Wilma Chan

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SACRAMENTO –  The founder and chair emeritus of the Asian Pacific Islander Public Affairs Association, .C.C. Yin released the following statement following media reporting the death of Alameda County Board of Supervisors Wilma Chan. According to media reports, Supervisor Chan was struck and killed while walking her dog Wednesday morning.
“We are all stunned to hear of Wilma’s passing as I just talked to my dear friend the other day.  Wilma was a dedicated and inspiring leader to the East Bay community and our state. She was a trailblazer who became the first Asian American woman elected to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors in 1994 and then to higher office in the California State Assembly where she served as the Assemblymember Majority Leader for her district.
“Wilma’s passion for helping young leaders was always evident as she strongly supported APAPA chapter leaders and student interns throughout Northern California for more than three decades. She was always a phone call away and her presence as APAPA’s events made them more meaningful. Her tragic death is a tremendous loss to our community. On behalf of the APAPA family, our hearts go out to her family,” said C.C. Yin, founder and chair emeritus of APAPA.
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