The Human and Scientific Costs of the “China Initiative”

Third Webinar: Building Coalition Against “China Initiative” Discrimination: Fighting racial targeting of Asian Americans and communities of color, past & present

The “China Initiative’s” racist targeting of Asian American and Asian immigrant scientists, researchers, and students – particularly those of Chinese descent – echoes past xenophobic national security initiatives that put immigrant communities and communities of color under unjust government scrutiny. This webinar, the third in this series, explores the civil society responses to Japanese incarceration and discrimination against Japanese Americans during World War II, and the targeting of Arab, Middle-Eastern, Muslim, and South Asian (AMEMSA) communities after 9/11, to inform how civil rights organizations and university leaders can more effectively challenge the new administration to end the “China Initiative” and the unfair scrutiny of Asian American and Asian immigrant scientists, researchers, and students. 

Connecting current discrimination against Asian Americans and immigrants of Chinese descent within the historical framework of the treatment of Asian Americans, other immigrant communities, and communities of color in the U.S. is essential for building a broad coalition to support the legal and policy reforms necessary to protect the civil rights of all communities. (See our coalition letter to the Biden transition team here).  Because academic and research institutions are the targets of “China Initiative” investigations, we must also understand the needs of university leaders and create a platform for allies and civil rights organizations to support the scientists, researchers, and students currently impacted by the latest wave of xenophobia. This webinar will focus on how to build these mechanisms for policy reform.

Moderator

Faiza Patel
Director of Liberty & National Security Program, Brennan Center for Justice

Keynote Speaker

Judy Chu
U.S. Congress, District 27, California

Panelist

Karen Korematsu,
Founder and Executive Director, Fred T. Korematsu Institute

Panelist

Becky Monroe,
Director of Fighting Hate and Bias program, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

Panelist

Leslie Wong,
President Emeritus, San Francisco State University

Second Webinar: Policy Needs for U.S. Science and Scientists

The second of our webinar in this series tackling the harms created by the Justice Department’s “China Initiative” will examine the policy reforms needed to protect U.S. science and scientists. Justice Department’s profiling of scientists of Chinese and Asian heritage and criminalizing administrative issues are unjust and discriminatory. It will explore how the Justice Department government’s current actions conflict with existing national policies to promote and protect fundamental scientific research. The government’s over-zealous and xenophobic targeting of Asian American and Asian immigrant scientists particularly drive needed scientific talents away from our nation. Speakers will discuss how this racial targeting not only undermines the rights and welfare of many Americans but also detrimentally impacts American research and enterprise. Our expert panel will discuss constructive policy ideas and changes to ensure U.S. research security and to protect the future of American science and innovation.

Moderator

Michael German
Fellow, the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law School

Speaker

Alice S. Huang 黄诗厚,
International Consultant; Senior Faculty Associate, California Institute of Technology; former President of American Association for the Advancement of Science

Speaker

Neal Lane
Senior Fellow of Baker Institute and Professor Emeritus of Physics and 
Astronomy, Rice University; former director, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Speaker

Sarina Neote,
Science Policy Manager, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

Speaker

Xiaoxing Xi 郗小星,
Laura H. Carnell Professor of Physics, Temple University; American Physical Society 2020 Andrei Sakharov Prize recipient

First Webinar: The Human and Scientific Costs of the "China Initative"

The U.S. government has ramped up efforts to target Chinese students and scholars and initiated charges against a number of researchers who had ties with China in scientific research. A new “Red Scare” is looming and has adversely affected the Chinese American and Asian American communities. These efforts have been carried out as part of the Department of Justice’s “China Initiative.”
 
Are the “China Initiative” achieving its goals? What are the human and scientific costs of it for the U.S.?
 
APAPA is collaborating with APA Justice, Asian Americans Advancing Justice and United Chinese Americans to host a seminar series to educate the public about the China Initiative and its impact.
 
This is the first of a series of webinars to examine the ramifications of the U.S. Justice Department’s “China Initiative” on the civil rights and security of Chinese Americans, Chinese immigrants, and Chinese Nationals working in the U.S., as well as the consequences for the broader American society.
 

The inaugural webinar is designed to provide policy-makers, journalists, attorneys, and community advocates with an overview of the “China Initiative” and the efforts civil rights advocates and the scientific community are making to protect the rights of those investigated and targeted under this discriminatory framework. 

Moderator

Michael German
Fellow, the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law School

Speaker

Steven Chu 朱棣文
Nobel Laureate, former U.S. Secretary of Energy, and Stanford University professor of physics 

Speaker

Margaret Lewis 陸梅吉
Professor, Seton Hall University School of Law

Speaker

John Yang
President and Executive Director, Asian Americans Advancing Justice | Asian American Justice Center 

API Women's Leadership Conference

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It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using ‘Content here, content here’